Friday, 29 September 2017

Emotional intelligence and prevoius experience in nursing

Roger Watson, Editor-in-Chief

Being  more emotionally inelligent - you know, being more of a 'people person', surely makes you a good nurse and more likely to complete your programme as a student...surely, as would previous caring experience; it makes sense. Or does it? This was the topic of an article from Soctland by Snowden et al. (2017) titled: 'The relationship between emotional intelligence, previous caring experience, and successful completion of a pre-registration nursing/midwifery degree' and published in JAN. The aim of the study was to: 'examine the relationship between baseline emotional intelligence and prior caring experience with completion of pre-registration nurse and midwifery education'.

Emotional intelligence was measured in nearly 900 nursing students from two universities in Scotland and a record was taken of any previous experience in nursing. The results suggest that, in fact, emotional intelligence is positively related to completing the nursing programme but that previous caring experience is not. This, of course, challenges current UK government policy which is trying to insist on all nursing students having previous caring experience. The authors concluded that measures of emotional intelligence should not yet be used in recruiting nursing students as, despite their results, a great deal more work is needed; this was a relationship, it did not provide score ranges to enable selection. While they do not say that previous experience should not be used, it seems clear to me that this is not a useful consideration in recruiting nursing students.

You can listen to this as a podcast

Reference

Snowden, A., Stenhouse, R., Duers, L., Marshall, S., Carver, F., Brown, N. and Young, J. (2017), The relationship between emotional intelligence, previous caring experience, and successful completion of a pre-registration nursing/midwifery degree. J Adv Nurs. doi:10.1111/jan.13455

Call for Blogs on gender based violence

Journal of Advanced Nursing
Special Section: Violence against Women
Guest edited by Parveen Ali
 
JAN is publishing a Special Section on violence against women, which will be launched on 25th November to coincide with the 16 days of activism against gender violence campaign. 

As part of this, I was hoping to organise JANinteractive blog series with a piece published each day on a particular aspect of violence against women/domestic violence.

I was hoping that you will consider writing a blog for me for this please? This can be on any aspect of gender based violence/violence against women/domestic violence. The blog piece should be between 500-750 words. If you are interested in submitting a blog and want to explore the idea, please contact Dr. Parveen Ali at first instance.

When submitting your blog contribution, please write 200 words about yourself and add a recent picture. The deadline for submitting complete blogs is 30th October 2017.
If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us.

Looking forward to receive your contributions.

Many thanks

Parveen

Thursday, 28 September 2017

Violence and depression in mental health nursing

Roger Watson, Editor-in-Chief

Nurses are no strangers to violence and it seems to be increasing. Violence against nurses takes place in any setting, acute hospitals, emergency departments, the community and in mental health care. It is this last area of nursing that is the focus of this article from Taiwan by Hsieh et al. (2017) titled: 'Predictors of Depressive Symptoms among Psychiatric Nurses Who Suffered from Workplace Violence' and published in JAN.

The aim of the study reported by Hsieh et al. was to examine: 'the possible factors that contributed to or prevented developing depressive symptoms among psychiatric nurses who suffered from workplace violence.' Nearly 300 nurses were involved and they completed questionnaires including the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale. All had experienced violence and nurses who were depressed were compared with those who were not. Those who had good family support were less likely to be depressed; it seems that family support may be a protective factor against depression when violence is experienced. In conclusion, the authors said: 'Our findings suggested that family support was a protective factor against developing depressive symptoms among assaulted psychiatric ward nurses. Our study indicated that enhancing family support of the assaulted psychiatric ward nurses could be a useful strategy to prevent developing depressive symptoms.

You can listen to this as a podcast

Reference

Hsieh, H.-F., Wang, H.-H., Shen, S.-H. and Li, Y.-C. (2017), . J Adv Nurs doi:10.1111/jan.13451

Thursday, 21 September 2017

Life after stroke: an exploration using Blogs

Caroline M. Thomas, Rhonda Allison, Jos M. Latour


Stroke can be a devastating and life changing event. This study explores the lived-experiences of stroke survivors as expressed in blogs and the role blogs play in the writers’ lives. Qualitative studies have tended to examine one aspect of life after stroke such as returning to work. As stroke often has multiple effects it is also necessary to look widely at its long-term lived-experience.

As the use of technology has increased, a new resource has evolved in the form of blogs. These narratives have enabled researchers to explore the lived-experience of stroke as a retrospective observer. In this study a phenomenological approach was used to undertake an interpretive thematic analysis of post-stroke bloggers work.

Eight bloggers gave consent for their blogs to be thematically analysed. Of the 40 categories that were developed, eight sub-themes were assimilated; internal dialogue, emotions, transition, stroke effects, healthcare, ‘in the world’, relationships, rehabilitation. Two main themes were identified related to perspectives of lived-experience; Internal relationship with ‘self’ and External relationship with ‘the world’. Participants expressed grief and loss, initially striving to regain their ‘old’ lives, their focus being recovery and independence. Although not linear in fashion, participants gradually moved towards accepting and adapting to their ‘new’ post stroke life. Participants did not stop wanting their situation to improve but began to live with their difficulties, rather than delay life while waiting to return to their previous lifestyle. Making this transition seemed to allow the participants to move their focus from an internal to external perspective and see themselves as individuals once more, rather than a lesser version of their pre-stroke self. Participants valued writing the blogs, finding them cathartic and gaining support from interactions with others. It may also be that writing the blogs allowed the participants to reflect on their situation and recognise the transitions occurring within them. Although this journey of discovery was one none of the participants wanted to take, they demonstrated that with time and the right support, it can lead to a new and meaningful future. Rehabilitation should respect this journey and its transitions, alongside physical recovery.

Although Healthcare Services played a role in the bloggers post stroke journey, their blogs demonstrated that recovery was also promoted by a range of factors, outside healthcare provision.  Self-belief, the support of family and friends and the peer reflection provided by other survivors’ blogs, all seemed to contribute to the regeneration of life after stroke, with the recognition that these potential sources of support could feel detrimental at times. With growing confidence in their new way of being, the bloggers could recognise what influences and opportunities were positive for them, taking control of their future recovery and life.




Thursday, 14 September 2017

Upright or lying down?

Upright or lying down?

Upright or lying down?

The traditional image of a woman giving birth is lying down on her back but other positions are possible, for example, squatting. Essentially the choice seems to be between being upright or lying down and it has, largely, been considered a matter of choice or comfort. But does it matter for birth outcomes? That was the subject of this review from Turkey by Deliktas and Kukulu (2017) titled: 'A Meta-Analysis of The Effect On Maternal Health Of Upright Positions During The Second Stage Of Labour, Without Routine Epidural Analgesia' and published in JAN

The aim of the study was to: 'detect the effect on maternal health of upright positions during the second stage of labour' and 22 articles met the review criteria. The results suggest that episiotomy (a surgical incision to avoid tearing) and instrumental labour (eg the use of forceps) was reduced when women used the upright positoin but that bleeding may be increased.

The authors concluded: 'The upright position applied to mothers without routine epidural analgesia during the second stage of labour probably slightly decreases the risk to the mother of instrumental birth and episiotomy. The reductions in such risks have some effects on the improvement of the comfort of birth. However, it is also concluded that the upright position may slightly increase the ratio of postpartum haemorrhage. For this reason, researchers are recommended to conduct concrete studies with well-designed methodology to quantitatively measure the postpartum haemorrhage amount.

You can listen to this as a podcast

Reference

Deliktas, A. and Kukulu, K. (2017), A Meta-Analysis of The Effect On Maternal Health Of Upright Positions During The Second Stage Of Labour, Without Routine Epidural Analgesia. J Adv Nurs.  doi:10.1111/jan.13447

Friday, 8 September 2017

Academic pubishing myths 5 - it is wrong to cite yourself

Academic pubishing myths 5 - it is wrong to cite yourself

Acaemic publishing myths 4 - journals do not like reviews

Acaemic publishing myths 4 - journals do not like reviews

Academic Publishing Myth 3 - myths surrounding publishing from MSc dissertations and PhD theses

Academic Publishing Myth 3 - myths surrounding publishing from MSc dissertations and PhD theses

Academic Publishing Myth 2 - you can only submit a manuscript twice

Academic Publishing Myth 2 - you can only submit a manuscript twice

Academic Publishing Myth 1 - You must learn to write in English

Academic Publishing Myth 1 - You must learn to write in English

Predatory publishers and journal hi-jackers

Predatory publishers and journal hi-jackers

Where is the best place to write?

Where is the best place to write?

Who should be an author on a scientific article and who should not?

Who should be an author on a scientific article and who should not?

Dealing with reviewers' comments

Dealing with reviewers' comments

Can I submit my manuscript to more than one journal at the same time?

Can I submit my manuscript to more than one journal at the same time?

The peer review process

The peer review process

Submitting a manuscript to the Journal of Advanced Nursing

Submitting a manuscript to the Journal of Advanced Nursing

What happens to my manuscript after I submit to JAN? (updated)

What happens to my manuscript after I submit to JAN? (updated)

What happens to my manuscript after I submit to JAN?

What happens to my manuscript after I submit to JAN?

Podcasting advice for Journal of Advanced Nursing authors

Podcasting advice for Journal of Advanced Nursing authors